Knowing about Spiritual Healing

Spiritual healing is the channelling of healing energies through the healer to the patient. It re-energies and relaxes patients to enable their own natural resources to deal with illness or injury in the best possible way. By directing energy, usually through the hands, the healer seeks to supplement the depleted energy of the recipient, releasing the body’s own healing abilities to deal with the problem in the most effective way for that individual. The healer asks for healing to be channelled from Spirit, God, the highest level of light. Unlike faith healing, it is not required that the patient have faith in the healer or in the healing process in order for healing to take place.

Spiritual Healers

Healers have the ability to connect with life force energy and act as a conduit for life force healing energy. A spiritual healer works with love and light which relaxes the whole body and heals for the highest good of the person receiving the healing. The effects and benefits of healing can be felt in many areas of your life – physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually and can be profound and life changing. Anybody can learn spiritual healing and become a healer to either heal themselves or others.

Benefits of Spiritual healing

Spiritual healing can be beneficial for anyone who feels that they lack harmony of body, mind or spirit. It can be given for any illness, stress or injury. There are no conditions placed on the type of healing which the patient may require: the Spirit of the patient gets exactly the kind of healing it needs to distribute to the mind or body it occupies. Healing always takes place in the manner in which it is needed. It can be helpful in a wide range of physical and psychological conditions, sometimes to a remarkable degree: the medically diagnosed nature of the illness appears to be irrelevant to the outcome, and case histories range from the relieving of everyday stresses and strains to the recovery of people who had been previously medically diagnosed as being terminally ill. In all these cases spiritual healing seems to have made a vital contribution to the patient’s recovery.

Spiritual healing has no side effects and is complimentary to any other therapy. It is completely non-intrusive as there is no touch used by the healer. The healer’s hands are raised about a foot from the patient’s body while the patient is sitting comfortably during the channelling of healing.

Types of Spiritual Healing

There are so many ways one can connect with spiritual healing energy. They include Prayer, Visualization, Meditation, Reiki, Spiritual Art, Angel Assisted Healing, Channeling of Spiritual Guides and Angels, Singing, Chanting, Drumming, Yoga, Tai Chi etc the list is endless.

Spiritual healing also opens up the connection with the Divine and his helpers (Guardian Angels, Angel and Spirit Guides, Fairies etc) and often enables one to develop and advanced their Psychic Abilities also.

True enlightenment is opened up through the wiliness to accept the Laws of the Universe with faith and an inner knowing and acceptance, that you are a part of a loving and advanced spiritual connection.

Looking for a qualified wellness practitioners in Jackson Hole Wyoming? Teton Spirit Connection is a one-stop shop for locals and visitors to find ways to nurture themselves and tap in to the healing power of the Tetons and the many wellness offerings available here.

Foods to Have the HIgh Calcium Content

Current research shows that calcium supplements, long recommended for osteoporosis prevention, may actually promote the condition. On the contrary, a diet rich in calcium will definitely help to keep your bones strong. Fortunately, the foods highest in that crucial mineral are delicious and versatile. Here’s a short list for making sure the score on your bone density test is amazing.

Tofu
Tofu is a great alternative to chicken or beef in stir-fries, and is delicious when marinated in your favourite flavours. 3-1/2 oz. of tofu contains 125 mg of calcium and it’s also packed with isoflavones, which bring an abundance of health benefits your way.

Beans
Beans are good any time of year, whether in soup, a refreshing salad, comforting chili or on their own and they’re a great way to add fibre, protein and calcium to your diet. Whether you choose white beans, navy beans, chickpeas or another favourite, you’ll obtain anywhere from 60-100 mg of calcium per 1/2 cup serving.

Almonds
Whether eaten alone, thrown in a salad or used as a crust on chicken or fish, almonds are one of the tastiest ways to reach your recommended daily intake of calcium. A handful (1/4 cup) of almonds contains 95 mg of calcium and are also a great source of fibre, protein and monounsaturated fats.

Sesame seeds
Sesame seeds bring so much flavour to any dish, especially when they’re roasted. They add a nice finish to any plate and are a fast and easy way to get some extra calcium. One tablespoon contains 90 mg of calcium, so next time you’re about to indulge in your favourite dinner, sprinkle a tablespoon or two on top.

Turnip greens
Here’s another great reason to add greens to your plate. Boiled turnip greens contain 95 mg of calcium per 1/2 cup serving, and okra, bok choy and broccoli follow with 35 to 50 mg per serving. Steam, roast or simply toss them into your next stir-fry and your bones will thank you.

Sardines
3-1/2 oz. of sardines provide the body with 370 mg of calcium. That’s more than one cup of milk. Sardines should be eaten with their soft bones because the bones hold up to 50 per cent of the calcium of the fish.

Yogurt
Not only does yogurt provide you with beneficial bacterial cultures, which keep your immune system strong and your digestive tract healthy, it also provides a whopping 300 mg of calcium per 3/4 cup serving.

Salmon
Salmon has been praised for its high content of omega-3 fatty acids, but it’s also a powerhouse when it comes to calcium. 3 oz. of salmon (with bones) delivers 180 mg of calcium and is a delicious alternative to chicken or meat for those nice summer barbeques.

Blackstrap molasses
There’s something comforting about some warm gingerbread with a nice cup of tea. It’s also comforting to know that the molasses that’s gone into the recipe contains 170 mg of calcium per serving.

Amaranth
Amaranth is one of the newest grains to hit health-food shelves, even though it’s been around for a while. You will see it in various cereals and crackers, but it’s even more delicious and nutritious when it’s made fresh at home. A 1/2 cup provides the body with 150 mg of calcium, and it’s a great alternative to pasta or rice when used as a side dish.

It’s also important to remember that regular consumption of red meat; salt, caffeine, alcohol, saturated fats and carbonated soft drinks reduce or inhibit calcium absorption. Everything in moderation is a good rule of thumb, but if you follow this list, you’re on the right path to getting your daily dose of calcium.